logorev.jpg
FAQ's: Choosing the Right Treatment

How do I know which treatment option is right for my dog?

When you find out that your dog has cancer, one of the first decisions you will need to make is whether or not to treat the cancer, and then deciding which treatment method to use.  In most cases,
surgery, chemotherapy or radiation will be recommended, depending on your dog’s type of cancer.  Often, a combination of these approaches will offer your dog the best chance of cure or long remission.  How you decide to treat your dog’s cancer is ultimately a very personal decision, and one which needs to be based on your dog’s type of cancer, their age, their personality, the treatment protocol that would be used, your individual philosophies, and unfortunately, the time and money that it would take to pursue treatment.

For example, if your dog is 14 years old and has a very aggressive form of cancer, it may be more loving to choose dietary changes or holistic supplements to manage your dog’s symptoms and make them comfortable than to pursue surgery or chemotherapy.  Or, you may realize that taking your dog in for radiation therapy two days a week for several weeks would be more damaging to their spirit than any potential benefit it may bring.  Educate yourself about the potential benefits of any treatment, be honest about what you are willing to commit to, and most importantly, ask yourself if this is really in the best interest of your dog, knowing her better than anyone else in the world.

This is an area where there are absolutely no right or wrong decisions.  Listen to your heart, evaluate your specific situation, and go from there. 

This website is not intended to replace the advice of a veterinary professional, and is for informational purposes only.   Please seek the advice of your veterinarian or a veterinary specialist before giving your dog any supplements or pursuing any alternative cancer therapies. 

©Georgia's Legacy.   For questions or comments about this website, please email
georgiaslegacy@fightcaninecancer.com.